Archive for Chris Jones

Guest Commentary: What is the Half-Life of Your Logistics Technology Investments?

According to Merriam Webster, one of the definitions of half-life is a period of usefulness or popularity preceding decline or obsolescence. It is important to match the half-life of your business processes with the half-life of the technology investments you are making. With the half-life of many business processes dramatically shrinking, the notion that every Logistics IT purchase needs to be a long-term strategic investment as opposed to a short-term tactical one has become bad […]

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Guest Commentary: Enabling the “Long Tail” of Trading Partners – Four Things to Consider

Whether you are an importer or forwarder acting on their behalf, we are all familiar with the “80/20” rule and how it applies to trading partner integration strategies. We focus on fully integrating the 20% of the trading partners that make up 80% of the volume for purchase orders, transportation, customs filing and shipment tracking. However, the remaining 80% of the trading partners who are poorly integrated (if at all) make up 80% of the […]

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Guest Commentary: Transportation Compliance Doesn’t Cost, It Pays

Traditional thinking is that government transportation compliance programs, such as hours of service (HOS) regulations, cost companies money. If the focus of your compliance efforts is solely to meet the regulation, then I concur. But, that approach is a lost opportunity to reduce operational costs through better driver and vehicle performance. Instead of just meeting the regulations, fleet operators need to look beyond to the benefits of telematics and advanced tracking systems to change driver […]

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Guest Commentary: The Future of Logistics Networks

Logistics networks have been around for 30 years in many forms, from cargo community systems to mode-specific and general value-added networks (VAN). In the beginning, these networks were built on highly proprietary technology that required complex integration. Their use was limited to the largest and most technologically sophisticated companies. The Internet weaned companies away from the use of proprietary networking technology, and portals made the networks more accessible to the “low tech” organizations, albeit in […]

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